How My Most Significant Relationship Inspired a Platform for Women’s Voices.

I guess you could say it started with the most significant relationship in my life. Fathers have their place, but mothers are the ones who make us, forming our bodies within their own. Once we are separate physically from their womb, we women continue to be made by our mothers to some extent, as we mold ourselves either in the same shape as our mother, or purposely into another. Continue reading

Swanee’s ‘Fortunate’ Life

Published in Orange City Life, 13 July 2017.

Musician John “Swanee” Swan made a name for himself in the music industry playing in a number of bands including Adelaide group Fraternity, and replacing his good friend Angry Anderson in the Party Boys, ushering their most successful period. He appeared with Cold Chisel from time to time providing backing vocals and percussion, until he was fired for “punching a roadie”. He was considered as Bon Scott’s replacement in AC/DC after Bon died from alcohol poisoning in 1980, but Swanee says it’s a good thing it didn’t transpire. “Bon was my drinking buddy! If I had’ve joined AC/DC they would have had another drunk as a singer. And why would you put them through that again?” Continue reading

Angry Anderson’s ‘Defiant’ Spiritual Journey.

Published in Orange City Life, 27 April 2017

‘I got accused of being a softy’: Long time rock n’ roll exhibitionist talks to Denise Mills about spiritual transformation and the value of trauma.

Being on the wrong side of thirty, I’m very familiar with Gary ‘Angry’ Anderson – particularly his tumultuous childhood, his crazy bad boy days when Rose Tattoo were at their most infamous, and the extensive charity work he does for a variety of causes. But before our interview last week I did some light stalking anyway, just to glean some additional insight into the guy. What I found was that Angry is still painted to be a hard-arse, who does a bit of charity work on the side – just to put some good out in the world. Continue reading

‘I think I’d Rebel’: Artist Ada Clark on the Art of Living

Published in Discover, 1 March 2017.

Ada’s Place is an art gallery just walking distance from Millthorpe’s main drag. It’s a charming old brick building with no hint of the smattering of colour, artisanship and vibrancy contained within its walls, apart from the brightly coloured piece of pottery which sits atop the mailbox and a simple sign: Ada’s place. But perhaps just as impressive as the works of art contained within, is the strength and vivaciousness of the artist herself. Continue reading

Integrity Matters. “Truth” Is Dangerous.

“You have to have just a touch of rascality to be human,” philosopher, speaker and writer Alan Watts explained in one of his many recorded lectures. “I find it difficult to get along with people who don’t know that they have it. People who command that they’re all sincere, all good, all pure, bore me to death and scare me. They’re unconscious of themselves, therefore they’ll suddenly do terrible things without warning.” Continue reading

Book Review: Why I’m No Longer Hatin’ on Ol’ Eat Pray Love.

I’ve read ol’ Eat Pray Love by Elizabeth Gilbert twice now: the first time I read it, which was 10 years ago, I FRIGGEN HATED IT. The second time, which finished it yesterday, I LOVED IT. I have to put my emotions in capitals because this book hit me right in the feels in two completely different ways.

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Book Review: The Ocean at The End of The Lane, by Neil Gaiman

I can’t say for sure what prompted me to read Neil Gaiman’s The Ocean at the End of the Lane, although I do believe it was a combination of two factors: first, I was impressed by the speech Neil gave at an Arts University back in 2012. You know how these famous writers are – they put on a black robe and a silly little hat (google tells me those hats are called mortarboards) and then they start saying incredibly inspirational things. Secondly, a friend told me how much he loved the book, describing it as “a children’s book for adults”. The description sounded bloody awful, but intriguing. Continue reading